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Blessings, sister Alicia

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Woman, 29, killed at Burning Man was hit by fur-covered 'Shagadelica' party bus filled with festival-goers
Associated Press reports:

The 29-year-old artist who was killed at Burning Man on Thursday was struck by a fur-covered party bus, it has emerged.
Alicia Louise Cipicchio, whom friends described as 'sweet, loving and adventurous', was hit by the vehicle carrying festival-goers just after midnight on Thursday and died at the scene. Authorities are now working to determine what led to the accident.

Cipicchio, from Jackson, Wyoming, was hit by a bus known as the 'Shagadelica', according to the Burning Man blog. She may have been riding on the double-decker bus before she fell under the wheels and was run over by it, said Sheila Reitz, dispatch supervisor for the Pershing County Sheriff's Office.

A website for the vehicle describes it as 'the ultimate night club on wheels... featuring a fully equipped DJ booth, an array of multi-beam laser sky projectors and lights, 32,000W of high quality sound, and a full bar'.

It is not known whether drugs or alcohol played a role in the accident, authorities said. Cars are banned from Burning Man, which has its own transit system with a 5mph speed limit strictly enforced for safety reasons.

Cipicchio worked at a fine art gallery in Jackson Hole and had studied art at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro, according to her Facebook profile. The page also reveals her love for hiking and shows her grinning alongside family members.

In a profile on couchsurfing.org, she listed her interests as 'nature, art, music, food, culture, philosophy, dancing, laughing' and said her philosophy was: 'Love your neighbor',
SFGate reported.

A friend added on the website: 'Alicia is such a sweet, loving, adventurous, caring spirit. She just radiates wonderful vibes.'
An employee at the gallery where she worked said Cipicchio, who worked in sales and management, was an 'amazing girl, full of life, loved by everybody', the
Reno Gazette Journal reported.

In a statement, Burning Man co-founder Marian Goodell said: 'This is a terrible accident. Our thoughts and prayers are with her family, friends and campmates. Black Rock Rangers and Emergency Services Department staff are providing support to those affected.'

Burning Man - the largest outdoor arts festival in North America - is patrolled by 500 rangers in addition to 95 federal and local law enforcement officers.

This is not the first death at Burning Man, Jim Parrish, Humboldt General Hospital chief executive, said earlier this week. He said that the most recent death at the event was seven years ago when an attendee fell under a trailer.

The shortest route to the hospital is more than 120 miles, but the roads mean it would take six hours to get there, but the hospital does have a helipad for air transport.

The tragedy comes after revelers eventually got through the event gates after being forced to wait outside due to heavy rains on Monday. On Thursday, it emerged that some festival-goers were forced to wait for up to 29 hours to get inside the gates.